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Akashi, from the series An Elegant Genji (Furyu Genji)

Akashi, from the series An Elegant Genji (Furyu Genji)

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Hiroshige, Utagawa and Utagawa Kunisada

As in all the triptychs from this series, the figures are dressed in contemporary fashions. In this composition, a lady and her maid stand on the balcony, look out over a grassy field, and lament the departure of Prince Mitsuuji, the Edo-period incarnation of Prince Genji. As in other triptychs from this series, clearly defined areas of foreground and background separate the work of the two artists and create a sense of deep recession. As with all the designs from this series, both artists’ signatures are included next to their respective specialties. Hiroshige’s landscape—an expansive coastal scene with moored boats, dramatic land formation, and a full moon—bears a striking resemblance to his later composition The Eight Views of Kanazawa Bay in Moonlight from 1857, which suggests that he would rework some of his established landscape designs.
Artist
Hiroshige, Utagawa and Utagawa Kunisada
(Japanese, 1797-1858) (Japanese, 1786-1864)
Title
Akashi, from the series An Elegant Genji (Furyu Genji)
Date
4/1853
Medium
Color woodcut
Dimensions
356 x 732 mm Overall
Credit
Bequest of John H. Van Vleck
Accession No.
1980.2209
Classification
Prints
Geography
Japan

Related

  • Mueller, Laura. "Competition and Collaboration: Japanese Prints of the Utagawa School." Leiden, The Netherlands: Hotei Publishing, 2007. p. 171, no. 157
  • Schlombs, Adele. "Hiroshige: 1797-1858." Koln, Germany: Taschen, 2007. p. 49
  • Elvehjem Museum of Art. "Hiroshige ten: Seitan 200-shunen kinen (200th Anniversary Hiroshige Exhibition)." Madison, WI: Elvehjem Museum of Art; Japan: Bun You Associates, 1996. no. 202

  • Competition and Collaboration: Japanese Prints of the Utagawa School: Chazen Museum of Art, 11/3/2007–1/6/2008
  • 200th Anniversary Hiroshige Exhibition (Hiroshige ten: seiten 200-shunen kinen): Elvehjem Museum of Art, 4/29/1996–12/8/1996

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