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KP’s Experimental Page

LOOKING TEN TIMES TWO

To build students’ observation skills, challenge each student to look at an artwork for thirty seconds and write a list of ten words, phrases, or thoughts associated with the work. After thirty seconds, repeat, adding another ten words or phrases to the list. See Learning Activities pdf for more details.

MAKE IT: RESILIENCE

To encourage students to think like an artist, ask them to design a work of art that demonstrates resilience without using representations or images of human figures.

CREATE A DOSSIER

(tk pending  clarification)

CIRCLE OF VIEWPOINTS

To build upon observations and link ideas, assign students a viewpoint–or perspective–from which to read the artwork from (such as one of the individuals or objects depicted in the image). Then ask them to write a letter to you from this person or thing’s perspective. The letter should address items that that individual or object might care about, believe in, or wonder about. See Learning Activities pdf for more details.

MAKE IT: SELF-PORTRAIT

Encourage students to think like an artist. Ask them to create a past, present, and future self-portrait to reflect where they’ve been, where they see themselves today, and what their future selves might look like.

MAKING MEANING

To build observation skills and develop visual literacy, blindly distribute printed copies of an artwork and do not provide any contextual information in advance. Next, ask students to draw, write, and mark up the image recording observations along the way. Challenge students to write an interpretative response to the work of art using visual evidence to support their understanding of the meaning of the work. See Learning Activities pd for additional details.

SEE, THINK, ME, WE

To help students connect ideas and consider context, assign a work of art and ask students to consider the following questions: 1) what do you see, 2) what do you think about what you see, 3) how do you relate to this artwork or what personal connections do you have, and 4) how is this work related to the world, our place in it, or the larger themes of this class? See Learning Activities PDF for more details.